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Contents:
  1. Off 2nd Avenue
  2. Account Options
  3. Old Days of the Radical Jews: How American Yiddish Theater Survived Through Satire - Toward Freedom
  4. ALA User Menu

Messiahs of greatly enlarges our understanding of Yiddish theatre and culture in the United States.

Off 2nd Avenue

It examines the innovative stage performances created by the Artef collective, the Modicut puppeteers, and the Yiddish Unit of the Federal Theatre Project. And it introduces to contemporary readers some of the most popular theatre actors of the 30s, including Leo Fuchs, Menasha Skulnik, and Yetta Zwerling. Throughout, it includes relevant photographs and contemporary comic strips, along with the first English-language publication of excerpts from the featured plays.

He has written a number of books about satirists and circus clowns, and created a series of comic strips with the illustrator Spain. Account Options Log Masuk.

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Pustaka saya Bantuan Carian Buku Terperinci. Dapatkan buku cetakan. Joel Schechter.

Temple University Press , 7 Mei - halaman. Joel Schechter has rediscovered the funny and often politically-charged plays of the American Yiddish theatre of the s.

Old Days of the Radical Jews: How American Yiddish Theater Survived Through Satire - Toward Freedom

Halaman terpilih Halaman Tajuk. Not the Yiddish art theatre of Maurice Schwartz, but satires and comedies and what was known as shund or literary trash: formulaic plays with stock characters which audiences loved and critics decried.


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Messiahs consists of a succession of chapters which gives every appearance of being a collection of free-standing articles rather than a true history of the subject. But there's some fascinating material within, and the topics in question are sufficiently neglected in standard histories that people interested in 20th-century American Yiddish culture, or in popular theatre outside the English-speaking mainstream, will want to take a look at this book.

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The book takes its title from the play Messiah in America by Moshe Nadir, whose story involves two rival theatrical producers attempting to boost ticket sales by presenting the arrival of the Messiah onstage. That's a lot of territory to cover, and the quality of the individual chapters varies considerably.

Overall, the best aspect about Messiahs of is the attention it brings to this material. Much of it was new to me, and I'm guessing it will be new to most people as well.

Book Review Index

Given the potential interest of the subject material, it's a shame Messiahs of isn't better written: stylistic infelicities throughout often make reading more of a chore than a pleasure. Schechter has a disconcerting tendency to hop from topic to topic, and the text often resembles an accretion of somewhat related facts rather than a selection and integration of information in order to make a point.

He also has a tendency to introduce topics repeatedly, as if they had never been mentioned before, suggesting that one more run through the copy editing department would have improved the final product. Schechter has a tendency to ride his hobbyhorses a little too hard: just when you think there can't possibly be any more references to Walter Benjamin, up pops another one. And his "what if?

What if Walter Benjamin wrote about the Yiddish theatre?